Test your knowledge of urban processes with this 15-question GCSE quiz.

If you haven't already done it, work through the urban processes web enquiry on the PowerPoint. Or look at it again to help fill in any gaps in what you know!

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3rd hms 18
4th Ark 18
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QUIZZES // Urban processes

Q1. What is ‘urbanisation’?

The process by which towns and cities get bigger.

The process by which an increasing proportion of people live in towns and cities.

The process by which people leave rural areas and move to towns and cities.

The changing of a town to a city.

Q2. What is ‘counter urbanisation’?

The process whereby people are counted as they enter a town or city.

The movement of people from one part of a town or city to another.

The movement of people from the rural areas into the towns and cities.

The movement of people out of built up areas and into the countryside.

Q3. When would re-urbanisation be most likely to occur?

After a part of the urban area has been redeveloped and modernised, so people are attracted back in.

At the start of the urbanisation process, when the towns and cities start to become popular.

When people start to move out of the towns and cities in search of a life away from the traffic, crime and pollution.

When a large factory closes, promoting job losses.

Q4. What is a megacity?

An urban area with a population of 10 billion people.

An urban area with a population of 10 million people.

An urban area with a population of 10 thousand people.

An urban area that is economically and politically significant on a global scale, that has links to other cities through trade.

Q5. What is urban primacy?

When a country has a capital city, this city is the primate city.

A primate city is one where the ratio of people to species of primates (monkeys and apes) is 1:10.

When the largest city (the primate city) is twice the size of the next biggest city in a country.

When a country has a series of towns and cities that have merged as the urban area grows.

Q6. What is a ‘major city’

A city with a population of 200,000 people.

A city with a population of 10 million.

An urban area that is economically and politically significant on a global scale, that has links to other cities through trade.

A city that has a specific function in the country, such as an important port.

Q7. What is the difference between a push factor and a pull factor?

A push factor is a reason to go to a specific location, and a pull factor is a reason to leave a place.

A push factor means leaving the urban areas and a pull factor means going back to the countryside.

A push factor takes place across a short distance, but a pull factor requires an international border to be crossed.

A push factor is a reason to leave an area and a pull factor is a reason to go to a specific place.

Q8. What is the difference between natural increase and urbanisation?

Natural increase leads to population growth where births are greater than deaths; urbanisation is an increase in the proportion of the people living in cities.

Natural increase is the opposite of urbanisation: more people die than are born and this would reduce the urban population.

Natural increase and urbanisation both describe towns and cities getting bigger; urbanisation is about numbers of people and natural increase refers to the physical size of the urban area getting bigger.

Natural increase refers to the skyward physical expansion of towns and cities whereas urbanisation is about numbers of people in the cities.

Q9. What is the link between suburbanisation and urban sprawl?

Suburbanisation and urban sprawl are opposite terms: urban sprawl is where a town or city gets physically bigger but suburbanisation makes an urban area shrink in size.

Suburbanisation is a smaller version of urbanisation, so the urban area does not grow at all so does not sprawl.

Suburbanisation can lead to urban sprawl, as more houses are built on the edge of the built up area so it enlarges (sprawls) onto the surrounding countryside.

Suburbanisation and urban sprawl mean the same thing: they are two words for the same process.

Q10. Study the graph. Which of the following statements is incorrect?

In 1970, 62% of the population of Europe lived in urban areas.

In 2000, 38% of the African population lived in urban areas.

In 1990, 70% of the African population lived in urban areas.

In 2030, 50% of the African population are projected to live in urban areas.

Q11. Study the graph again. Which of the following is correct?

African’s urban population had a 38% increase in the 50 years from 1950 to 2000.

African’s urban population had a 23% increase in the 50 years from 1950 to 2000.

Europe’s urban population had a 10% increase in the 50 years from 1950 to 2000.

Europe’s urban population had a 50% increase in the 50 years from 1950 to 2000.

Q12. Study the graph again. Which of the following is correct?

In 1990, Africa’s percentage urban population was larger than Europe’s percentage urban population.

In 1990, Europe’s percentage urban population was larger than Africa’s percentage urban population.

In 1990 the percentage urban population in Europe was equal to that of Africa.

In 2020 the percentage of urban population of Africa is exactly double that of Europe.

Q13. Which of the following cities was not a megacity in 2020 (according to data from the UN)?

Tokyo, Japan

N’Djamena, Chad

Delhi, India

Beijing, China

Q14. What is a world city?

A city that has a population of 10 million people.

A city that has a large proportion of companies and businesses from around the world.

An urban area that is economically and politically significant on a global scale, that has links to other world cities through trade.

An urban area that trades raw materials with another city.

Q15. Which of these urban processes would lead to a reduction in the number of people living in towns and cities?

Q16. Which of these urban processes would lead to a reduction in the number of people living in towns and cities?

Re-urbanisation

Urbanisation

Counter urbanisation

Rural-to-urban migration.

Finished!

You scored this time. The more correct answers you give, and the fewer incorrect answers you guess, the better your score.

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